Dangers & Risks

Hepatitis B does not discriminate

IT CAN PUT EVERYONE AT RISK

Hepatitis B can have a lasting impact on everyone in the healthcare continuum, and it puts patients, HCPs, and institutions at risk.1-4

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HEPATITIS B (HBV) INFECTION IS DANGEROUS

100x

HBV is 100x more infectious than HIV1

7 Days

HBV can remain infectious outside the body for at least 7 days1,2

Up To 50%

of hepatocellular carcinomas are caused by HBV5

15%

of cirrhosis diagnoses are caused by HBV6

Hepatitis B can have serious consequences ~5,500 deaths related to HBV occur each year in the US5


Map with HBV Callout

Hepatitis B vaccines have been available for nearly 40 years, yet HBV infections are on the rise7,8

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Estimated new cases of HBV in the United States have risen ~11% over a 5-year period8

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As many as 2.2 million people in the United States may be infected with hepatitis B9

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The risk of exposure to HBV for healthcare workers remains high3,4

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Despite the high risk for HCPs, exposures often go unreported7


There is no cure for hbv

EFFECTIVE VACCINATION IS CRITICAL TO REDUCING THE SPREAD OF THE DISEASE10

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The dangers and risks of HBV

Dr. Robert Gish, hepatologist and adjunct clinical professor of medicine at University of Nevada – Las Vegas, talks about the dangers and risks of hepatitis B infection.

Watch full video
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The numbers say it’s time to do something different

The numbers don’t lie. Hepatitis B is on the rise despite 40 years of available 3-dose vaccines.7,8

INDICATION AND IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION
INDICATION

HEPLISAV-B is indicated for prevention of infection caused by all known subtypes of hepatitis B virus in adults 18 years of age and older.

IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION

Do not administer HEPLISAV-B to individuals with a history of severe allergic reaction (e.g., anaphylaxis) after a previous dose of any hepatitis B vaccine or to any component of HEPLISAV-B, including yeast.

Appropriate medical treatment and supervision must be available to manage possible anaphylactic reactions following administration of HEPLISAV-B.

Immunocompromised persons, including individuals receiving immunosuppressant therapy, may have a diminished immune response to HEPLISAV-B.

Hepatitis B has a long incubation period. HEPLISAV-B may not prevent hepatitis B infection in individuals who have an unrecognized hepatitis B infection at the time of vaccine administration.

The most common patient-reported adverse reactions reported within 7 days of vaccination were injection site pain (23%-39%), fatigue (11%-17%), and headache (8%-17%).

Please see full Prescribing Information.

Phone IconCall 1-84-HEPLISAV (1-844-375-4728) or order online.
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INDICATION AND IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION
INDICATION

HEPLISAV-B is indicated for prevention of infection caused by all known subtypes of hepatitis B virus in adults 18 years of age and older.

IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION

Do not administer HEPLISAV-B to individuals with a history of severe allergic reaction (e.g., anaphylaxis) after a previous dose of any hepatitis B vaccine or to any component of HEPLISAV-B, including yeast.

Appropriate medical treatment and supervision must be available to manage possible anaphylactic reactions following administration of HEPLISAV-B.

Immunocompromised persons, including individuals receiving immunosuppressant therapy, may have a diminished immune response to HEPLISAV-B.

Hepatitis B has a long incubation period. HEPLISAV-B may not prevent hepatitis B infection in individuals who have an unrecognized hepatitis B infection at the time of vaccine administration.

The most common patient-reported adverse reactions reported within 7 days of vaccination were injection site pain (23%-39%), fatigue (11%-17%), and headache (8%-17%).

Please see full Prescribing Information.

References:

1. Walayat S, Ahmed Z, Martin D, Puli S, Cashman M, Dhillon S. Recent advances in vaccination of non-responders to standard dose hepatitis B virus vaccine. World J Hepatol. 2015;7(24):2503-2509. 2. Than TT, Jo E, Todt D, et al. High environmental stability of hepatitis B virus and inactivation requirements for chemical biocides. J Infect Dis. 2018 Oct 24. doi: 10.1093/infdis/jiy620. [Epub ahead of print]. 3. American Nurses Association’s Needle Stick Prevention Guide. World Health Organization website. http://www.who.int/occupational_health/activities/2need guide.pdf. Accessed July 18, 2018. 4. Schillie S, Harris A, Link-Gelles R, Romero J, Ward J, Nelson N. Recommendations of the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices for use of a hepatitis B vaccine with a novel adjuvant. MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 2018;67(15):455-458. 5. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Hepatitis B. In: Hamborsky J, Kroger A, Wolfe S, eds. Epidemiology and Prevention of Vaccine-Preventable Diseases. 13th ed. Washington, DC: Public Health Foundation; 2015:149-174. https://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/pubs/pinkbook/downloads/hepb.pdf. Accessed October 16, 2017. 6. Starr SP, Raines D. Cirrhosis: diagnosis, management, and prevention. Am Fam Physician. 2011;84(12):1353-1359. 7. Schillie S, Murphy TV, Sawyer M, et al. CDC guidance for evaluating health-care personnel for hepatitis B virus protection and for administering postexposure management. MMWR Recomm Rep. 2013;62(RR-10):1-19. 8. Viral hepatitis statistics and surveillance. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention website. https://www.cdc.gov/hepatitis/statistics. Accessed September 28, 2018. 9. Kowdley KV, Wang CC, Welch S, Roberts H, Brosgart CL. Prevalence of chronic hepatitis B among foreign-born persons living in the United States by country of origin. Hepatology. 2012;56(2):422-433. 10. Mast EE, Weinbaum CM, Fiore AE, et al. A comprehensive immunization strategy to eliminate transmission of hepatitis B virus infection in the United States: recommendations of the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) Part II: immunization of adults. MMWR Recomm Rep. 2006;55(RR-16):1-33.